#EGU18 Geoscience Games Night – List of Games

This year’s European Geoscience Union General Assembly will feature the first ever, and totally unofficial (at the moment), Geoscience Games Day. It has been organised by SeriousGeoGamer Chris Skinner, the creative Sam Illingworth, the inventive Rolf Hut, and the volcanic Jazmin Scarlett. All the details are in the image below.

G4G

Games for Geoscience Oral Session

Games for Geoscience Poster Session

Geoscience Games Night

SeriousGeoGames will be supporting the Geoscience Games Night, both by providing the drinks (free beer!) and bringing along some of our games and will be debuting our prototype deck-builder card game, Flood: Attack & Defend. Below you will find a list of the games we know people are bringing, but do feel free to bring your own along too. Let us know if you’re bringing a game and we’ll add it to the list.

SeriousGeoGames – Flood: Attack & Defend (deck-builder card game)

SeriousGeoGames – Flash Flood! (short, game-like experience)

SeriousGeoGames – TideBox demo (short, game-like experience)

Sam Illingworth – Settlers of Catan: Global Warming (Board game, ~90 mins, 3-4 players)

Rolf Hut – Breath of the Wild (Zelda computer game for Nintendo Switch)

Jazmin Scarlett – Portal 1 & 2 (Physics-based videogames)

Elke Meyer – The Drift Game (Gamified visualisation)

Auguste Gires – 509 084 drops in 114 days (Interactive rain-based computer game)

Anthony Parsons – The Research Game (Competitive board game)

Jana Wendler and Emma Shuttleworth – Downpour (Interactive flood game)

David Crookall – Debriefing – (Post-game analysis)

Richard Essery – “Thinking Detectives: Climate Change in the Alps” (Game and discussion)0)

Massimiliano Zappo – Water Cycle Snakes and Ladders (Poster Game)

HEPEX Games –

Louise Arnal – “The Adventure Game: Pathways to running a flood forecast centre)

Louise Crochemore – “The Water Management Game: Test your ability to manage a water resevoir over a season”

M. H. Ramos – “The Flood Control Game: Do probabilistic forecasts lead to better decisions?”

We’re all very excited for this, and are looking forward to seeing you in Vienna on April 11th!

SeriousGeoGames at #FloodandCoast18 @FloodandCoast

This last week we’ve been at the Flood and Coast Conference in Telford, supporting an exhibit by the University of Hull’s Energy and Environment Institute (EEI). Convened by the Environment Agency, Flood and Coast brings together all the people who are working on reducing the flood risk around the UK, and helping to make people better prepared and more resilient when sadly it does happen.

The EEI exhibit was showcasing its range of research and investments, in particular around flood risk and environmental resilience. Flash Flood! was used as part of the exhibit and proved very popular, and we also took along our 360 camera. Take a look at our highlights below.

Chris Skinner takes a tour of the exhibit hall –

What is it like to be a Lego person in Atkin’s Lego flood town, part of the Emvironment Agency stand –

Chris Skinner demonstrated Flash Flood! to Clare Moriarty, CB, Permanent Secretary to DEFRA

Pics by Flo Halstead

If you want to relive Flash Flood!, try our 360 YouTube video –

See you at our next event!

Chris

Flood Defender – Developer Report

A few weeks ago we heard from the SEED Masters students working on developing TideBox. This post hears from another group developing Flood Defender, a gamified version of a long-standing flood risk management practical used in the Geohazards module at the University of Hull. Flood Defender will merge our hydraulic model with the Unreal 3D gaming engine and allow people to test their own flood defence schemes – can they stop the Uncanny Valley city from flooding, and can they do it within budget? Let’s hear how they are getting on – 

Flood Practical Gamification also known as Flood Defender is a flood simulation that takes place in the fictional Uncanny Valley city (but is based on the real city of Carlisle) which implements a simplified CAESAR-Lisflood model. The project presents many challenges and within this blog post we the developers of Flood Defender would like to talk about these challenges and experiences.

defendcity1

The first challenge as a team was to familiarise ourselves with Unreal Engine 4 (UE4) which is the chosen games engine the project had previously been developed on. None of us had any prior experience and this is a constant on-going learning experience for the team throughout the development.

Another challenge the team faced was to understand the existing project as we inherited it, making improvements to the existing implementation where necessary, and continuing the progress. This is made more complicated due to a lack of design and technical documentation being passed on from previous project.

Each member of the team had different primary responsibility which they spearheaded and collaborate with fellow members to accomplish; we have Adam that works on the UI (User Interface), Christopher whom works on the flood defences, and Alex who is working on the flood model. Despite these roles each of us worked closely together to ensure each member is moving forward and is remained informed on recent changes as part of our team development strategies.

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“Working on the flood game has been an exciting new challenge for me. I was attracted to this project due the fact it was using the Unreal engine. It was a chance for me to learn a new engine and have the responsibilities of working in a team. My main responsibilities has been UI development and Zoning cost calculations. I’ve enjoyed my role in the project and look forward to future development on this.”  – Adam Davies

“The only single word I could use to describe my time on this project would be ‘Experience’, working with unreal challenged me, as my previous experience was using libraries such as DirectX and openGL. Having the chance to work using a full environment game engine was exciting to say the least.

My main responsibilities on the project began as fixing issues which existed from the previous project. This mainly consisted of limited implemented features and completely broken implemented features, most of which were associated with reset functionality of the application.

Further into the project my role changed, I began implementing features relating to flood defences. To gain a good idea of the client’s needs, multiple methods which may be used were prototyped and demonstrated, and the preferred method is being further developed into a fully implemented feature.” – Christopher Atkinson

“My main responsibility is the CAESAR-Lisflood model and this is an extremely challenging endeavour for me as I have no experience in this field. It has however been extremely satisfying for me to research this topic, reviewing existing implementations and trying to adapt the model code correctly into the flood game” – Alex Dos Santos

defendcity5

We’ve been given the fortunate experience on working on such a great project and we’ve always focused on delivering the best we can to the development of the project. We have aimed from day one to leave the project in a much better state then when we initially received it and we feel as a team that we have and continue to do this. This experience has taught us, as developers, many valuable lessons that we will go on to take to our future careers.

Thank you for reading,

Adam Davies, Christopher Atkinson and Alex Dos Santos – Flood game developer team of 17-18