12 Days of Plastic-free Christmas – A Christmas Repeat

Would it even be Christmas if you weren’t subjected to endless repeats? Christmas repeats are good though – it doesn’t matter if you’ve seen it hundreds of times the sight of Del Boy and Rodney saving the day dressed as Batman and Robin is still funny 22 years on. That’s why we are bringing you a repeat of the 12 Days of Plastic-free Christmas.

The 12 Days of Plastic-free Christmas was produced by a partnership between Earth Arcade, #MyPlasticPledge, and the Energy and Environment Institute at the University of Hull, with special contributions from Kids Against Plastic and Kate Smith. Each day we looked at a small part of Christmas, highlighted some of the plastic related issues with it, and suggested a quick, easy, and cheap way to reduce that impact. You can see each post by clicking the links below.

Day One – Christmas Cards

Christmas cards, as suggested by their name, are usually made of card. However, they can contain plastic elements such as glitter.

christmas-cards-you-will-need

Day Two – Christmas Decorations

Most shop-bought house decorations are made of plastic. Check this post for some ideas of how to make your own, beautiful and plastic-free, alternatives.

christmas-decorations-oranges

Day Three – Christmas Wreaths

A beautiful wreath can look stunning on your front door, set across a backdrop of snow and lights. How can you make sure yours is free of plastic?

christmas-wreath-final

Day Four – Christmas Trees

Is a plastic tree worth it, even if you use for it a decade or more? Is pulling a tree out of the ground any better?

We also hear from Amy and Ella from Kids Against Plastic who show us how to make some gorgeous plastic-free decorations.

Plastic Free Christmas Decorations

Day Five – Mince Pies

We really hope there is no plastic inside any mince pie, but shop-bought ones come wrapped into plastic, foil and card. Kate shares her family recipe for making your own.

Hannah and Ellie from #MyPlasticPledge chat about the packaging around mince pies.

Day Six – Refillable Gifts

Stuck for a Secret Santa gift or a handy stocking filler and don’t want to waste cash on some pointless plastic trinket? Try one of these great refillable gifts.

brownie-mix

Day Seven – Wrapping Paper

There is a surprising amount of plastic in wrapping paper, from labels, ribbon and glitter, to plastic infused with the paper itself. How can you be sure it’s plastic-free? Try the scrunch test or make your own.

Lucie tells us all about the plastic in wrapping paper.

Day Eight – Reindeer Food

Making reindeer food is a fun activity to do with the kids and to inject some Christmas magic. However, most recipes will use glitter. We share our plastic-free recipe.

reindeer-food-final

Day Nine – Christmas Stockings

What can be better than a traditional stocking, filled with toys, sweets, and fruit, hanging over the open fire. A plastic-free one obviously, unless you’ve been naughty and it’s full of dirty coal.

stocking

Day Ten – Christmas Crackers (Outsides)

Bang! Aren’t Christmas Crackers fun? But that shiny card contains plastic – how can you possibly make your own?

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Day Eleven – Christmas Crackers (Insides)

Jumping frogs, fake mustaches, tiny combs – just what is the use of the plastic objects you get inside the Crackers?

Day Twelve – Christmas Dinner

Finally, the big day, and the wonderful Christmas Dinner – Turkey, potatoes, pigs-in-blankets, sprouts, and piles and piles of plastic packaging and waste. make your own canvas bag and buy loose vegetables to keep your waste to a minimum.

So that was our 12 Days of Plastic-free Christmas. If you have tried one of tips, we would love to see your efforts – feel free to share them with us either here, on our Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

Thank you to all who helped and contributed – Katie Parsons, Kate Smith, Flo Halstead, Freija Mendrick, Phil Bell-Young, Chris Skinner, the Meek family, Lucie Parsons, Dan Parsons, Hannah Lightley, Ellie Bartle, and Kat Sanders.

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